Thursday, June 25, 2015

National HIV Testing Day

What is already known on this topic?

Among the estimated 1.2 million persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States in 2011, 14% were living with undiagnosed infection. The majority of persons who received a diagnosis of HIV infection in 2011 were men who have sex with men (62%).

What is added by this report?

In 42 jurisdictions with numerically stable estimates, HIV prevalence in 2012 ranged from 110 per 100,000 persons (Iowa) to 3,936 per 100,000 (District of Columbia). The percentage of HIV-infected persons with diagnosed HIV ranged from 77% in Louisiana to ≥90% in Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, and New York. Among men who have sex with men, the percentage of HIV cases that were diagnosed ranged from 75% in Louisiana to ≥90% in Hawaii and New York in 39 jurisdictions with numerically stable estimates.

What are the implications for public health practice?

To achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategy's objective to increase the percentage of persons living with HIV who know their serostatus to ≥90%, sustained efforts are needed to fully implement routine HIV testing. The percentage of persons with undiagnosed HIV varies by geographic area, and efforts tailored to each area's unique needs and situations might be needed to increase the percentage of persons aware of their infection.

Estimated* number of persons aged ≥13 years with HIV infection (diagnosed and undiagnosed), and percentage of those with diagnosed HIV infection, by jurisdiction — United States, 2012
Jurisdiction
Persons living with diagnosed or undiagnosed HIV infection
Persons living with undiagnosed HIV infection
Persons living with diagnosed HIV infection
No.
(95% CI)
Rate§
(95% CI)
No.
(95% CI)
%
(95% CI)
Alabama
14,400
(13,600–15,300)
358
(338–381)
2,300
(1,500–3,200)
84.0
(78.6–89.2)
Alaska
790
(710–900)
133
(120–152)
70
(0–190)
91.1
(78.0–99.9)
Arizona
16,200
(15,700–16,700)
301
(292–310)
1,900
(1,400–2,500)
88.3
(85.0–91.4)
Arkansas
5,800
(5,500–6,200)
238
(226–254)
1,000
(620–1,400)
82.8
(77.2–89.3)
California
183,300
(180,100–186,900)
583
(573–595)
20,700
(17,100–24,300)
88.7
(86.7–90.3)
Colorado
12,600
(12,100–13,100)
294
(282–305)
1,300
(740–1,800)
89.7
(86.1–93.3)
Connecticut
13,500
(12,900–14,100)
444
(424–464)
1,300
(850–1,800)
90.4
(86.8–93.9)
Delaware
4,300
(4,000–4,500)
559
(520–585)
430
(120–720)
90.0
(83.5–96.9)
District of Columbia
21,700
(20,900–22,400)
3,936
(3,791–4,063)
2,300
(1,400–3,100)
89.4
(86.2–93.2)
Florida
127,900
(125,400–130,000)
777
(761–789)
15,900
(13,500–17,900)
87.6
(86.1–89.3)
Georgia
57,300
(55,700–58,700)
706
(686–723)
10,700
(9,000–12,300)
81.3
(79.1–83.8)
Hawaii
3,500
(3,300–3,700)
300
(283–318)
250
(0–500)
92.9
(86.3–100.0)
Idaho
1,100
(1,000–1,200)
86
(78–93)
100
(0–220)
90.9
(81.5–100.0)
Illinois
45,700
(44,100–47,000)
427
(413–440)
7,500
(5,800–8,700)
83.6
(81.3–86.9)
Indiana
11,400
(10,700–11,900)
211
(198–220)
1,700
(970–2,200)
85.1
(80.7–90.0)
Iowa
2,800
(2,600–3,000)
110
(102–117)
520
(280–750)
81.4
(74.8–89.2)
Kansas
3,700
(3,400–3,900)
157
(144–165)
560
(310–780)
84.9
(78.8–91.0)
Kentucky
8,300
(7,900–8,700)
228
(217–239)
1,200
(780–1,700)
85.5
(80.7–90.6)
Louisiana
22,600
(21,700–23,500)
596
(572–619)
5,100
(4,200–6,000)
77.4
(74.3–80.5)
Maine
1,800
(1,600–1,900)
157
(140–166)
90
(0–230)
95.0
(86.8–100.0)
Maryland
43,300
(41,500–45,000)
880
(843–914)
8,100
(6,200–9,900)
81.3
(77.8–85.0)
Massachusetts
27,000
(26,200–27,900)
477
(463–493)
4,100
(3,300–5,000)
84.8
(81.6–87.5)
Michigan
17,500
(16,800–18,200)
211
(203–219)
2,700
(1,900–3,500)
84.6
(80.5–88.1)
Minnesota
8,400
(8,000–8,800)
188
(180–197)
1,200
(760–1,600)
85.7
(81.2–90.0)
Mississippi
10,300
(9,600–10,900)
420
(392–445)
1,700
(1,100–2,200)
83.5
(79.3–88.1)
Missouri
13,200
(12,600–13,900)
263
(251–277)
1,800
(1,300–2,600)
86.4
(81.6–90.1)
Montana
650
(550–730)
77
(65–86)
30
(0–130)
95.4
(80.7–99.7)
Nebraska
2,200
(2,000–2,400)
145
(132–158)
290
(110–490)
86.8
(79.4–94.4)
Nevada
9,600
(9,100–10,100)
421
(399–443)
1,400
(740–1,900)
85.4
(81.0–91.4)
New Hampshire
1,600
(1,500–1,800)
141
(132–159)
120
(0–310)
92.5
(82.4–100.0)
New Jersey
43,100
(41,800–44,500)
580
(563–599)
6,800
(5,500–8,200)
84.2
(81.3–87.0)
New Mexico
3,600
(3,400–3,800)
210
(199–222)
400
(160–630)
88.9
(82.7–95.0)
New York
177,000
(174,800–179,600)
1,070
(1,057–1,086)
12,600
(10,000–15,400)
92.9
(91.4–94.3)
North Carolina
32,000
(31,100–32,900)
395
(384–406)
4,200
(3,100–5,200)
86.9
(84.1–89.9)
North Dakota
330
(270–390)
56
(46–67)
20
(0–100)
93.9
(73.9–100.0)
Ohio
22,900
(22,100–23,700)
237
(229–245)
4,200
(3,400–5,000)
81.7
(78.7–84.7)
Oklahoma
6,700
(6,300–7,100)
214
(201–227)
1,100
(680–1,600)
83.6
(78.4–89.5)
Oregon
8,400
(7,900–8,700)
256
(241–265)
1,100
(540–1,500)
86.9
(82.1–92.3)
Pennsylvania
40,900
(39,700–42,100)
378
(367–389)
5,700
(4,500–6,700)
86.1
(83.8–88.8)
Rhode Island
2,500
(2,300–2,700)
278
(256–300)
280
(10–490)
88.8
(81.1–98.9)
South Carolina
19,300
(18,200–20,100)
489
(461–510)
3,200
(2,000–4,000)
83.4
(79.2–88.3)
South Dakota
520
(450–590)
76
(66–86)
90
(10–180)
82.7
(68.7–98.3)
Tennessee
19,200
(18,300–19,800)
357
(340–368)
2,700
(1,700–3,400)
85.9
(82.4–89.9)
Texas
104,300
(101,800–106,200)
497
(485–506)
18,000
(15,300–19,800)
82.7
(81.2–84.7)
Utah
2,900
(2,700–3,200)
132
(123–146)
430
(160–700)
85.2
(76.6–94.1)
Vermont
810
(730–890)
150
(135–165)
0
(0–50)
100.0
(93.7–100.0)
Virginia
25,100
(24,200–25,900)
367
(354–379)
3,200
(2,300–4,100)
87.3
(83.9–90.4)
Washington
15,400
(14,700–16,200)
268
(256–282)
1,900
(1,200–2,600)
87.7
(83.7–91.5)
West Virginia
2,200
(2,000–2,400)
139
(126–152)
330
(150–520)
85.0
(76.6–92.6)
Wisconsin
6,400
(6,000–6,900)
134
(125–144)
980
(450–1,530)
84.7
(77.7–92.4)
Wyoming
320
(260–390)
67
(55–82)
40
(0–110)
87.5
(68.6–100.0)
Total**
1,218,400
(1,207,100–1,228,200)
467
(462.5–470.5)
156,300
(144,100–165,900)
87.2
(86.4–88.0)
Abbreviations: HIV = human immunodeficiency virus; CI = confidence interval.
* Estimates were derived by using back-calculation. Estimates were rounded to the nearest 100 for numbers >1,000 and to the nearest 10 for numbers <1,000 to reflect the uncertainty inherent in statistical estimates.
Persons whose most recent known address or residence at death is in the jurisdiction by December 31, 2012.
§ Per 100,000 population.
Estimates for jurisdictions with <60 diagnoses per year (average) over the most recent 5 years (2008–2012) are considered numerically unstable.
** Because column totals were calculated independently and to correspond to methods for national estimates with 24-month reporting delay, the values in each column might not sum to the column total.

Source=CDC

No comments:

Post a Comment